Fraud Alert: Fake Customer Service Numbers KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

You need to call customer service, but don’t have the number. So, you do a quick online search or ask your smart speaker to dial it for you. Be careful, you could wind up talking to a fraudster who’s pretending to be a customer service representative.

Scammers can have their fake numbers show up at the top of online search results, so you wind up calling them instead of the legitimate company—and you may not know it.

How can you tell?

The safest way to find a customer service number is to check a sound source, such as a bank statement, credit card, or warranty card.

If you connect with customer service and are asked for your password or PIN or other sensitive personal information, hang up. You’ve dialed a fraudster.


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Is it safe to click the unsubscribe link in unwanted email? KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

Your e-mail inbox is overloaded – advertisements from retailers you shop with, newsletters from organizations you support, and a whole lot of spam that you don’t want and don’t plan to read. But it just takes time to go through all of this.

Should you click on the unsubscribe links? Or is that just asking for trouble?

It all depends…

According to digital security expert Paul Ducklin, a principal research scientist with Sophos who is based in England. His big concern: That unsubscribe link could be designed to trick you into giving up your email password.

“If you click on an unsubscribe link and it doesn’t just go, ‘you’re unsubscribed,’ but it goes, ‘now you need to put in your email address and your password,’ keep your wits about you, and don’t get phished,” Ducklin cautioned. “Obviously these are people who are not spamming you, they’re using the unsubscribe as a hook to try to get your password which is a risk that did not exist in the early days of spam.”


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Get ahead of scammers: why it’s important to report fraud KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

Scammers are getting craftier with their pitches by using new technology to steal your information and money. Believe it or not, most Washington consumers don’t report robocalls or fraud attempts. However, you should report any attempted scams, says Chuck Hardwood, Regional Director of the Federal Trade Commission.

Why you should report fraud…

Any efforts, whether it’s by phone, email, online, or in person, should be reported. People must tell their stories because they add pieces to the puzzle that authorities are trying to put together. The larger the picture becomes, the easier it will be for law enforcement to protect consumers. When you choose not to report fraud, you’re helping scammers.

Even if you don’t fall for a fraudsters tricks, it’s still helpful to report the situation because this crucial information can help authorities. Every story is important to them. Report scams to the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov/complaint, or with the State Attorney General’s Office at www.atg.wa.gov/file-complaint or toll-free at 877-382-4357.


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What to do with old online accounts you don’t use anymore? KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

We are proud to say we have partnered with long time local area consumer protection advocate Herb Weisbaum of KOMO to bring you Technology and Title Tips.

Chances are you have old online accounts that you haven’t used for a long time, maybe years.

Old Online Accounts

And the odds are that the old passwords on those unused accounts are weak ones. If you can remember other places you used them, this is a good opportunity to generate some new and secure ones.

Signing up for an account is easy. That’s not always the case when you want to cancel. Some sites hide this information, so you won’t leave. If you run into a roadblock, rather than give up, do a search for “how to cancel” or call customer service.


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What is MFA and why you need to enable it now KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

We are proud to say we have partnered with long time local area consumer protection advocate Herb Weisbaum of KOMO to bring you Technology and Title Tips.

When someone calls you on the phone, it’s not always easy to tell if they’re a con artist pretending to be with a government agency, your bank or credit card company.

If you reuse the same password on a lot of accounts – as so many people do – you’re putting all of those accounts at risk, if just one of them is compromised. You should have a strong and unique password for each of your accounts. You can use a password manager to remember them for you.

At the very least, it’s imperative that you have a secure and unique password for your key accounts: email, bank, credit card, financial and social media accounts. Then set up multi-factor authentication (MFA) whenever possible.

MFA can help to protect your accounts.

MFA requires you to enter a code – sent to you by phone or email – as well as the password, to verify it’s really you. Yes, this slows you down a few seconds, but it can stop a fraudster. It can also save you from the hassles of having to deal with a compromised account.


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Ticor Tech Tip – Facebook long lost friends may not be who they say KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

When a long-lost friend contacts you via Facebook Messenger, you need to stop and make sure they really are your friend and not a fraudster in disguise who hopes to get you to send them personal information or possibly money.

“Hi, it’s your uncle Bob. I just wanted to tell you there’s this new government grant that you can get more information about, just text me your number and we’ll talk to you about it.”


If you get contacted by someone via Facebook Messenger, whether you know them or not, and they immediately want you to text or email them, and they ask for money or personal information – you’re dealing with a fraudster.


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Ticor Tech Tip – Beware of bogus emails about package deliveries KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

We are proud to say we have partnered with long time local area consumer protection advocate Herb Weisbaum of KOMO to bring you Technology and Title Tips.


Fraudsters are now sending emails designed to look like they’ve been sent from FedEx, UPS, DHL or the U.S. Postal Service.

The messages say a package is on its way, and you just need to click on the link or open the attachment to find out more and set up your delivery preferences. These bogus messages even have bogus tracking numbers. With so much online shopping going on right now, this is the perfect scam.

If you click on the link or open the attachment, you could put malware on your mobile device or computer, or you could be taken to a site that tricks you into giving away financial or sensitive personal information.


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Ticor Tech Tip – A Simple Way to Manage a Overload of Passwords KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

We are proud to say we have partnered with long time local area consumer protection advocate Herb Weisbaum of KOMO to bring you Technology and Title Tips.

You probably have dozens of online accounts and that makes it a real challenge to create strong passwords – passwords you can remember – for all of them.

That’s why so many people use a few simple passwords over and over again.
But weak passwords – like 12345, password, 123abc, admin, or iloveyou – are
easy to crack. And if that password grants access to multiple accounts, it puts all
of them at risk, if just one of them is compromised. The solution is to use a password manager. It lets you create complex passwords and store them securely for easy access on all your devices.


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Please join us in Welcoming Chris Del Rosso to Ticor Title!

We’re excited to announce that Chris Del Rosso has joined our Ticor Title Team! Chris’s experience in foreclosure searches, recordings, and examining will be an invaluable benefit to our clients.

About Chris

Chris started in the title industry in 1998 after graduating from Central Washington University with a degree in Criminal Justice. Chris has worked in recording, starts, examining, and in the title unit. For the last five years he has focused on being a resource for investor clients. Chris is a proud father of two daughters and a son ranging from 11 to 18 years old. He’s a huge Seahawk fan, loves the outdoors, and is excited to be a valuable resource to our clients here at Ticor.

Ticor Tech Tip – Fraudsters taking advantage of Contact Tracing process KOMO / Ticor Consumer Tip

We are proud to say we have partnered with long time local area consumer protection advocate Herb Weisbaum of KOMO to bring you Technology and Title Tips.

Contact tracing is one of the critical tools health departments have to help stop the spread of the coronavirus. Unfortunately, it’s also given criminals a new way to scam people. Impostors are texting people, pretending to be with a health department, in order to steal their personal information, money – or both.

Before calling, some health departments send a text message telling you to expect a call – from a specific number – about an urgent
public health matter. Real contact tracers will ask for your name and address, date of birth, work information, and contact preferences. They will never ask for your Social Security number, immigration status, your bank account or credit card information, or ask you to pay
for anything.


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